Hamlet in Krakow

August 16, 2012 at 6:00 am (Eastern European Shakespeare, Hamlet in Performance, Intercultural Performances, Shakespeare on film, Trans/Gendered Shakespeare)

(This short post will be updated at a later date)

My friend Sonia Front, of the University of Silesia, and I will visit Krakow today, to go to the Teatre Stary, where Andrej Wajde put on a production of Hamlet in 1989.  Aneta Glowacka tells me that this is an important production in thinking about Klata’s H.  I’ve just been looking on-line and found this interview with Wajde, which among other things, explains why European theatre seems so comfortable with reassigning gender roles :

http://www.webofstories.com/play/13759

Wadje’s official website translates into English

http://www.wajda.pl/en/teatr/teatr34.html

Otherwise, it’s Google Translate to get the gist… Online Polish resources include:

http://www.hamlet.edu.pl/uczen/?id=ol0910te7

http://www.polskieradio.pl/24/291/Artykul/582286,Wajda-postawi-40-Hamletow-na-jednej-scenie

http://www.e-teatr.pl/pl/realizacje/10146,szczegoly.html

http://portalwiedzy.onet.pl/28152,,,,wajda_andrzej,haslo.html

http://www.culture.pl/baza-film-pelna-tresc/-/eo_event_asset_publisher/eAN5/content/teresa-budzisz-krzyzanowska

http://www.tvp.pl/kultura/teatr/teatr-telewizji/archiwum/hamlet-iii

http://www.tvp.pl/kultura/teatr/teatr-telewizji/archiwum/hamlet-iii

We went to the Stary Teatr (Old Theatre) but got there too late – it has an amazing looking interactive museum (which houses Wajde’s Old Hamlet’s helmut).  The theatre appeared to be putting on works by Klata (I believe he is to be the new artistic director) and later this week, by another director, Heiner Muller’s Titus Andronicus.

The reason we were so late, by the way, was because we went to Schindler’s Factory first. Now a museum about Schindler’s list, including exhibits about some of the survivors, about the ghetto and the concentration camp, and about the Jewish and the Polish Resistance, it also recorded how important a role theatre played during this period. The Stary Teatr was appropriated by the Germans as part of their propoganda machine, but underground theatres also flourished. A young man called Karol had acting aspirations but later went to seminary instead.  He became Pope John Paul II. Young Jews such as Joseph Bau, whose concentration camp wedding features in Spielberg’s film, survived in part because of their creative talents.

Krakow is only an hour away from where I’m staying in Katowice, so I will pop back early next week – when the museum is open.

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